Questions to Ask

Lift a Building’s Roof to

Create More Space

Add Value and Increase Marketability

Q: How much does roof lifting cost?
A: Roof lifting costs depend on the total area being lifted, the existing construction details, the original and required heights, and more. While the average range of costs varies widely ($5 – $20 per square foot) it is far less expensive than traditional construction, expansion, and rebuild options. You are invited to contact S.T.I. directly for a free cost estimate for a specific property.

Q: How many square feet can be lifted?
A: There is no limit to building size. The E-Z Riser process has been lifting millions of square feet, for over 30 years. Often an entire roof is raised as one section, but it is also common to lift a portion of a roof, or sequential sections of larger buildings.

Q: How high can a roof be lifted?
A: There is no prescribed limit to how high S.T.I. can lift a roof. Most often, clear heights are doubled or tripled, increasing the cubic capacity accordingly. We invite your contact to explore your specific requirements.
 
Q: Is the E-Z Riser process safe?
A: The E-Z Riser process is the oldest and only truly safe method of roof lifting ever attempted. By utilizing the existing building columns and ensuring that the building is never separated from its structural support and foundation, this method has a proven safety record, even in constantly operating occupied warehouses.

Q: Does the roof need to be replaced after lifting?
A: The original roof condition is preserved completely, as it is raised with its support structure at once and intact.

Q: Can you raise a roof in an occupied building?
A: YES! The unique E-Z Riser process is so safe and secure, that it is performed in many occupied warehouses, to avoid the disruption and cost of conventional expansion, new construction, or relocation. One example occurred at Chrysler Motors when S.T.I. lifted a 115,000 square foot roof section for their Detroit Diesel division from 15’ to 27’, while surrounding operations continued around the clock, seven days a week.